Apologies to the Bengali Lady

Theatre (new writing, international)

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  • Accessibility:
    Wheelchair Accessible Toilets
    Sight not needed
    May not apply to all performances. You'll find more information about accessibile performances and how to book tickets in the accessibility tab below.
  • Babes in arms policy: Babies do not require a ticket
  • Policy applies to: Children under 2 years
Dates, Times and Prices

Description

Cook and clean and not be seen. Step into the mind of a British-Bengali woman writing the history of Shakespearean prostitute-actresses in colonial Bengal. But as academic fixation turns into existential crisis, where does Shakespeare end and the Bengali Lady begin? Apologies puts the Bengali Woman front and centre as she fights with the Shakespeare in her head to be seen, heard, known.

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General venue access

  • Wheelchair Accessible Toilets
    Sight not needed
  • Accessible entry: Information not supplied
  • Wheelchair access type: Wheelchair accessible (please contact the venue for more information)

  • Stairs: Information not supplied

Each venue can contain several space with different accessibly information. Visit the venue page for full venue accessibility info


How and when to make an access booking

Our access tickets service is available to anyone who:

  • Would like to book specific accessibility services, e.g. a hearing loop, audio description headsets, captioning units, seating in relation to the location of the BSL interpreter
  • Requires extra assistance when at a venue
  • Has specific seating requirements
  • Is a wheelchair user
  • Requires a complimentary personal assistant ticket to attend a performance

Lesley Warner 3 days ago

When the British first arrived in India they brought Shakespeare with them, and this play depicts a British-Bengali woman's attempt to write about the women who played his female characters, mindful that "respectable" women could not be actors. It's an interesting story, beautifully told.

Anna D'Andrea 6 days ago

Beautiful writing, entertaining and informative. Highly recommend!


Participants - for further details on our audience and published review policies, including how to add or opt out of reviews, please click here.

British Theatre Guide (3/5 stars) 8 days ago

The scene is set, with a young academic (Anya Banerjee) busily working away on her laptop amidst many scattered papers. She's clearly having issues with her work and, when a drunken and rowdy chorus of Auld Lang Syne echoes through the window, she promptly give the world the finger. Thereafter,...

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UK Theatre Web (3/5 stars) 10 days ago

There's a mix of passion and didactic in the script [...] It does make me think about many issues raised.

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Participants - for further details on our audience and published review policies, including how to add or opt out of reviews, please click here.

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Participants - for further details on our audience and published review policies, including how to add or opt out of reviews, please click here.

Dates, Times and Prices